Allergies by Season: Differences and Similarities | Claritin®

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Allergies by Season

How long do seasonal allergiesX seasonal allergies
A chronic disease characterized by an overreaction of the immune system to certain allergens commonly found outside, such as tree, grass, or weed pollens,or mold spores. Also called hay fever, outdoor allergies.
last? For the most unfortunate allergyX allergy
An exaggerated response of the immune system to a substance that is ordinarily harmless.
sufferers, all year long. Regardless of the climate or weather, allergies can be a problem. Explore each season to see what common airborne allergens you should prepare for.

Icon of a house with snowflakes surrounding it representing winter
WINTER

When temperatures dip down low, especially below freezing, people with seasonal pollenX pollen
A fine, powdery substance, typically yellow, consisting of microscopic grains discharged from the male part of a flower called stamens or from the male cone of a tree.
allergies may expect to get relief from their symptoms. But if you're still sniffling, sneezing and blowing your nose during winter months, you may need to add indoor allergiesX indoor allergies
Characterized by an overreaction of the immune system to certain allergens (see Allergens) commonly found indoors, such as mold spores, pet dander, cockroaches or dust mites (also called perennial allergies). Indoor allergies tend to last longer than allergies caused by exposure to outdoor…
to your list of sinus woes.

Common allergens

  • Indoor MoldX Mold
    Parasitic, microscopic fungi (like Alternaria) that float in the air like pollen. Mold spores are a common trigger for allergies and can be found in damp areas, such as the basement or bathroom, as well as outdoors in grass, leaf piles, hay, mulch or under mushrooms.
  • Dust MitesX Dust Mites
    A common trigger for indoor allergies. They are microscopic mites that live in the fibers of pillows, mattresses, blankets and carpet. They live off of our dead skin cells. Inhalation of their droppings can cause allergic reactions such as runny nose, sneezing and nasal congestion.
  • Pet Dander
Icon of a garden with flowers and butterflies representing spring
SPRING

Buzzing bees and chirping birds won't be the only things heard in the coming spring months. An echo of “ah-choos” will be coming from more than 50 million Americans sneezing and wheezing in a chorus. We have seasonal allergiesX seasonal allergies
A chronic disease characterized by an overreaction of the immune system to certain allergens commonly found outside, such as tree, grass, or weed pollens,or mold spores. Also called hay fever, outdoor allergies.
to thank for this, most commonly caused by pollenX pollen
A fine, powdery substance, typically yellow, consisting of microscopic grains discharged from the male part of a flower called stamens or from the male cone of a tree.
and moldX mold
Parasitic, microscopic fungi (like Alternaria) that float in the air like pollen. Mold spores are a common trigger for allergies and can be found in damp areas, such as the basement or bathroom, as well as outdoors in grass, leaf piles, hay, mulch or under mushrooms.
.

Common allergens

  • Tree PollenX Pollen
    A fine, powdery substance, typically yellow, consisting of microscopic grains discharged from the male part of a flower called stamens or from the male cone of a tree.
  • Indoor MoldX Mold
    Parasitic, microscopic fungi (like Alternaria) that float in the air like pollen. Mold spores are a common trigger for allergies and can be found in damp areas, such as the basement or bathroom, as well as outdoors in grass, leaf piles, hay, mulch or under mushrooms.
  • Outdoor Mold
Icon of grill, thermometer and sun representing summer
SUMMER

Summer means sunshine, backyard barbeques, family, friends, festivals and other fun outdoor activities. But the millions of Americans who suffer from allergic reactions to grass pollens might be making excuses to stay indoors.

Common allergens

  • Grass PollenX Pollen
    A fine, powdery substance, typically yellow, consisting of microscopic grains discharged from the male part of a flower called stamens or from the male cone of a tree.
  • Indoor MoldX Mold
    Parasitic, microscopic fungi (like Alternaria) that float in the air like pollen. Mold spores are a common trigger for allergies and can be found in damp areas, such as the basement or bathroom, as well as outdoors in grass, leaf piles, hay, mulch or under mushrooms.
  • Outdoor Mold
Icon of leaves falling off trees and a rake representing fall
FALL

Autumn is a season filled with crisp air, falling leaves in most of the U.S., pumpkin carving and, of course, hay feverX hay fever
See Seasonal Allergies
symptoms. Damp leaf piles can also be breeding grounds for moldX mold
Parasitic, microscopic fungi (like Alternaria) that float in the air like pollen. Mold spores are a common trigger for allergies and can be found in damp areas, such as the basement or bathroom, as well as outdoors in grass, leaf piles, hay, mulch or under mushrooms.
, so allergyX allergy
An exaggerated response of the immune system to a substance that is ordinarily harmless.
sufferers, be on the lookout! As the weather cools down and you spend more time indoors, you could start suffering from indoor allergiesX indoor allergies
Characterized by an overreaction of the immune system to certain allergens (see Allergens) commonly found indoors, such as mold spores, pet dander, cockroaches or dust mites (also called perennial allergies). Indoor allergies tend to last longer than allergies caused by exposure to outdoor…
once again.

Common allergens

  • Ragweed PollenX Pollen
    A fine, powdery substance, typically yellow, consisting of microscopic grains discharged from the male part of a flower called stamens or from the male cone of a tree.
  • Indoor MoldX Mold
    Parasitic, microscopic fungi (like Alternaria) that float in the air like pollen. Mold spores are a common trigger for allergies and can be found in damp areas, such as the basement or bathroom, as well as outdoors in grass, leaf piles, hay, mulch or under mushrooms.
  • Outdoor Mold
  • Dust MitesX Dust Mites
    A common trigger for indoor allergies. They are microscopic mites that live in the fibers of pillows, mattresses, blankets and carpet. They live off of our dead skin cells. Inhalation of their droppings can cause allergic reactions such as runny nose, sneezing and nasal congestion.
  • Pet Dander